07. 23. 11. 12:33 pm

Of Sunny Days, Rainbow Connections and Miss Piggy

      

If you’re reading this, chances are you’ve spent a portion of your life with a muppet (significant others and offspring excluded).  You remember them:  in a time before X-Box, Pixar films and every other “youth” show leading you to believe kids break out in song at their lockers, there were these simple, hand-guided, voice-off-camera muppets.  No elaborate special effects, no 3D glasses or handheld devices required, just colorful foam, felt, feathers, fur, plastic googly eyes and some funny voices.  We counted along with The Count, danced with Grover, sounded out words with Big Bird. As we got older, the muppets grew, too: with them, we “took” Manhattan, explored outer space and experienced literature through re-told classics like Treasure Island, A Christmas Carol and The Wizard of Oz. Later, we were introduced to a new muppet, the Gelfings of The Dark Crystal, wonderous elf-like creatures living in an enchanted world.  

Jim Henson, the creative genius behind those moments and more iconic lovable characters such as Bert and Ernie, Miss Piggy and of course, Kermit (who Henson himself voiced) is the subject of a six month installation at New York’s Museum of the Moving Image entitled Jim Henson’s Fantastic World. A collaborative exhibit with the Smithsonian Institute, here Henson’s entire career is highlighted, starting with his early college drawings and ideas, on through his innumerable achievements in film and television, including the famous daily television show that pioneered not only puppetry, but also launched countless studies in children’s psychology, educational theory and the social affects of television on the family culture. (Sesame Street, by the way, is now broadcast in over 140 countries worldwide and produced in more than 20 languages.)

 

The exhibition features many of the working muppets on display (a word Henson created, meshing “marionette” and “puppet”), along with storyboards, costumes and other artifacts directly linked to the construction and operation of the colorful characters. In addition, every weekend, the museum will present various public programs including film screenings and hands-on workshops to celebrate the vast Henson legacy and make for a fun family experience.  This is a don’t-miss documentation of American ingenuity and creativity come to life.

 

Jim Henson’s Fantastic World is on exhibit at The Museum of the Moving Image now through January 16th, 2012.  Learn more about the museum, the exhibit and special programs and events here.

04. 22. 12. 11:36 pm ♥ 1

COLOR COMES ALIVE

Last week, I captured these images from the FIT exhibit ‘Hue/Color/Tint/Shade: The Meaning, Psychology, and Cultural Influence of Color.’ Designed by first-year students in the Visual Presentation and Exhibition Design program, the temporary installation explored the topic of color as a selling tool and the ways in which color affects and provokes consumer behavior. The Pantone-outfitted mannequins adorned the foyer of the main building for only two weeks, and while most were bright and cheery, there were a couple that creeped me out. Overall, it was a great visual exercise, appropriate for a Spring debut.

07. 15. 12. 01:33 pm
SEE WHAT ‘MAD MEN’ STARTED…
…and how 21st-century graphic designers and artists are finishing it.  
An interesting exhibit is out on Governors Island this summer, Graphic Design — Now in Production, presented by The Smithsonian’s Cooper-Hewitt Design Institute and made possible in part by funding from Converse, among others.  Communication mediums influenced by the rise in technological and creative advances include posters, film titles, magazines and more, and it speaks to how we receive visual messaging much more readily than any other method. (My favorite exhibit was the Iconic TV series that apply the stark, modernist Swiss design style to American television fare.  The posters, by Vienna-based designer Albert Exergian,  challenge the viewer to call on their “mental reservoir of knowledge…and memories.”)
Graphic Design — Now in Production, on view now through Mon., Sept. 3, 2012, open weekends and holidays, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., Building 110 on Governors Island, NYC.  Admission is free.  High-res

SEE WHAT ‘MAD MEN’ STARTED…

…and how 21st-century graphic designers and artists are finishing it.  

An interesting exhibit is out on Governors Island this summer, Graphic Design — Now in Production, presented by The Smithsonian’s Cooper-Hewitt Design Institute and made possible in part by funding from Converse, among others.  Communication mediums influenced by the rise in technological and creative advances include posters, film titles, magazines and more, and it speaks to how we receive visual messaging much more readily than any other method. (My favorite exhibit was the Iconic TV series that apply the stark, modernist Swiss design style to American television fare.  The posters, by Vienna-based designer Albert Exergian,  challenge the viewer to call on their “mental reservoir of knowledge…and memories.”)

Graphic Design — Now in Production, on view now through Mon., Sept. 3, 2012, open weekends and holidays, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., Building 110 on Governors Island, NYC.  Admission is free. 

08. 07. 11. 06:46 pm
sooooo disappointed i missed the McQueen exhibit!
Note to self: sometimes the long line is worth it — 
stay in it!
(via @FashionweekNYC) High-res

sooooo disappointed i missed the McQueen exhibit!

Note to self: sometimes the long line is worth it —

stay in it!

(via @FashionweekNYC)

05. 11. 12. 06:57 pm ♥ 1

THINK PINK

That all-American girl Barbie has had countless glamourous ensembles, nearly 140 careers, a dozen cars, and only one guy, Ken. (There was, however, a little rumor about this army dude, Joe, you know, the one with the kung-fu grip…)

And now the aged 50+ icon can add another feat to her roster:  she is the sole subject of an outstanding student project at NYC’s Fashion Institute of Technology. Dubbed “Playing with Fashion,” the Class of 2012’s senior exhibition has totally transformed the lobby of the Pomerantz Art and Design Center on campus: everywhere you look, there are distinctively styled elements of fashion, jewelry, interior design, photography and more — all designed for Barbie’s 21st century lifestyle.  Fans of Barbie — or those who simply appreciate creativity and imagination at work — should not miss this fantastic installation.

The Barbie at FIT Visual Presentation and Design Exhibition Class of 2012 Senior Show is on display through September 3, in the Pomerantz Art and Design Center lobby.  FIT is located at 7th Avenue and 28th Street in Manhattan. The exhibition is free and open to the public.